Grayson Erhard: I need to believe in my voice

What is the first experience you remember with music?
My dad was a bluegrass mandolinist and guitarist for a very long time when I was growing up. For several years from the age of 2, I got to hang out with his band and observe band practices. So watching his band play was probably my first experience. It was the coolest thing to me as they practiced at our home once a week.  My mom is also an avid music fan and it was really fun getting to go to concerts and festivals with her throughout my childhood.

What time did you decide you wanted to be a singer?
Honestly, I tried pretty hard when I was 15. I took vocal lessons and everything, but something didn't click. I was so obsessed with guitar at that time that I actually stopped taking vocal lessons because vocals felt more like an obligation than a passion. Eventually, in 2011, I took a vocal class in college that forced me to sing. I had to sing in the dorms! Yikes! That was pretty embarrassing to be honest, but it gave me a thick skin to get past all of the self-consciousness that comes with singing. I quickly became infatuated with singing and it even took over my guitar obsession for several years! It was probably the most valuable class I ever took.

What musical personality do you think influenced you most in your beginnings?
You're going to make fun of me, but probably Eddie Van Halen. I thought he and his band were the coolest band ever. Jimi Hendrix had a big influence on me as well, but nothing compared to Van Halen!

What are your favorite singers or musicians?
If you’re interested, you can check out my Spotify playlist called “My Favorite Vocalists!”


If you don’t have time to check out the playlist, I’ll name a few. Vocally, it’s been Matthew Santos, Matt Corby, Johnny Craig, and Sameer Gadhia (Young the Giant). With guitar, probably Andy Mckee, Antoine Dufour, Tosin Abasi, and Guthrie Govan. All of these vocalists and guitarists represent different things to me, but one thing they all have in common is that they are very good at specific things. I know some of these people so I’m not going to get too into this haha.

I admire technical ability a lot, but over the past several years I’ve taken a break from advancing that side of my playing to focusing mostly on songwriting. Songwriting and lyric writing is completely different than technical skill on an instrument and it really brings you back to why you play in the first place--songs.

What repertoire do you feel most at ease today?
Not sure what at ease means, but all of my songs demand a lot out of me. I have a habit of writing music that's consistently too difficult for me to play. So I don't really feel at ease about any of them haha! Obviously, the older songs have become easier to perform, but it's not like they're a walk in the park.

Tell us, please, any experience or anecdote that comes to mind that has to do with your voice or your professional experience.
A huge moment in my singing career was the day I learned that I need to believe in my voice regardless of all my self-consciousness and self-doubt. It allowed me to finally escape my own head. Singing is a constant psychological game that I play with myself. I have to believe that I’m the best vocalist in the world when I’m performing and tracking, but when it comes to practicing, I have to be willing to sound bad again to conquer a new technique.

What do you think about the current situation of musicians and singers?
I think musicians really need to stop putting so much self-value into getting a record deal. . . I don't see the need for labels unless they are a platform that you can release music through that mutually benefits both parties without the musician compromising their rights to their creations or musical integrity. I also see their value after you've created a massive following and need to access the label's global infrastructure.

Not a lot of musicians have the ability to discern good from bad people and I think that leads a ton of people down the wrong path. I'm no stranger to that. I believe in full creative and business control as the artist. I only work with people that truly care and don't treat me like a porcelain doll. More musicians need to take full control over their careers!

What advice or recommendations would you give to those who are now beginning to sing?
Stop caring what other people think and research your butt off! You're only as good as how much you practice.

Do you want to add something more about your relationship with music?
I think a lot of people will observe musicians and wish that they could only make/play music with every second of their time. I want to shatter that illusion. With everything in life, there needs to be a balance. I honestly can't do only music with my time. I get burned out. Anybody who says they do nothing but make music is probably not being completely honest. There's a lot more to being a musician than just making or performing music. I've spent a lot of mental energy reassuring myself that I don't have to only do music. Taking a break from music is valuable and shouldn't be a source of stress.

Where can our readers find more information on the net about you?
Every link you need is right here: https://graysonerhard.com/social-links

Clases online de Perfeccionamiento en Técnica Vocal

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Comunidad Valenciana, Spain
COACH VOCAL de referencia internacional. Titulada oficial Superior en Pedagogía del Canto con Matrícula de Honor y Premio Extraordinario Fin de Carrera por unanimidad. Titulada en Canto, Piano e Ingeniería. Profesora online Máster Universidad Europea Miguel de Cervantes-SLKE. Dir. Vocal Center. Full Member National Assoc. Teachers Singing (EE.UU.). Miembro European Voice Teacher Association. Deleg. Asoc. Española de Profesores de Canto. Dir. Asoc. de Músicos Profesionales de España-CV. Experta en Técnica Vocal. Especializada además en voces infantiles y juveniles. Asesora vocal FremantleMedia TV. Prepara asiduamente a participantes de concursos de televisión. (+34) 651315263
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